Marketing

Word-of-Mouth Is Powerful Marketing

July 29, 2010
Marketers may spend millions of dollars on elaborate ad campaigns, but often what really influences consumers is what they hear from a trusted source. READ MORE

Innovation: You Have to Start Somewhere

July 26, 2010
Denise Gabel, chief innovation officer, for the Filene Research Institute, says the U.S. credit union movement could learn a lot about innovation from a French Canadian singer from Montreal. READ MORE

CUs and Young Adults

July 18, 2010
What are the biggest barriers to getting young adults to consider using credit unions? READ MORE

A Chemical Reason for Social Networks' Popularity?

July 14, 2010
When people interact on social networks, their brains release the chemical oxytocin, the same chemical that's released when people experience acts of trust, loyalty, or generosity. This shows how people are wired to interact with others. READ MORE

Reach Out to the Hispanic Market: Four Steps

July 13, 2010
The Hispanic market is the largest, fastest-growing, youngest, and most underserved market in the U.S. It presents a great growth opportunity for credit unions seeking to remain viable in the future. READ MORE

Members Embrace Teen Card

July 08, 2010
A debit card geared to teenagers has generated strong interest among youth seeking financial independence and parents not yet ready to cede all financial controls. Meriwest Credit Union’s new Flow Account allows teenagers to carry a personal Visa Debit Card rather than cash. READ MORE

Need Members? Target Millennials

July 01, 2010
CUs must continue to attract more consumers in their peak borrowing years—age 25 to 44—and attract even younger members—age 18 to 24. That's where “millennials" come in. READ MORE

CUs Grow Business

June 30, 2010
Business development is coming into its own. Ten years ago, only a handful of credit unions had business development departments, and they were usually part of the marketing function. READ MORE

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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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