Items Tagged with 'women'

ARTICLES

You Go, Girl!

In money matters, the balance of power appears to be shifting toward women.
November 25, 2013
Nearly two-thirds of women say they are the primary breadwinner in their households.
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The Sentinels Among Us

CUs represent fiscal guardianship, protecting members from fraud and enlightening them with financial literacy.
May 13, 2013
Your vigilance in assuring excellent member service is unparalleled.
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Let's Shake On It

Nonverbal behavior can have much more impact than verbal messages.
March 17, 2013
What message can CU staff send with a simple handshake?
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Ephemeral or Harbinger?

How many consumers join to secure an auto loan—and then go dormant?
March 11, 2013
Let your CU be a harbinger of better times for your members as opposed to a fleeting vision of delight.
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Global Women’s Leadership Network Addressed at Breakfast Event

CUs applauded for community economic development efforts.
February 28, 2013
Women CU leaders from more than 23 states around the country gathered at the National Museum of Women in the Arts during the GAC.
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Demographic Shifts Provide Challenges, Opportunities

In addition to ethnic changes, the U.S. is also experiencing dramatic social change.
September 18, 2012
While the U.S. established its reputation as a melting pot centuries ago, we're more diverse today than ever before.
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How Does Your Garden Grow?

CUs invest in members to sow the seeds of success.
May 14, 2012
Meeting members’ needs is like gardening: Each requires nurturing, patience, and persistence.
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The Guest in the Garage

Fresh solutions come from approaching business issues with a knowledge and understanding of the facts.
April 16, 2012
Finding answers to our problems may take time, trial, and error, but performing due diligence is a great start.
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The View from Three-and-One-Half-Inch Heels

Does your CU think outside the shoe box?
December 1, 2011
Don’t let your CU miss the opportunity to challenge members’ and the public’s expectations of what you have to offer.
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Lora's Research Roundup

Won’t You Be My Neighbor?

Keeping up with the Joneses is less of an issue these days.
November 20, 2011
Financial trends reveal neighborhood changes with increased income disparity and new family lifestyle choices.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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