Items Tagged with 'government'

ARTICLES

Public National Debt Exceeds Bank Deposits

National public debt now totals $11.6 trillion, compared to the $10.6 trillion in U.S. bank deposits.
February 3, 2013
Public debt has grown 23% since 2010 vs. 13% for deposits.
Read More
The Bridge

When Work Disappears

Jobs may be the biggest factor confronting our country today.
November 30, 2012
The lack of work is a far bigger issue than the few who mooch off government.
Read More

Courage and Conscience

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporters share lessons from Watergate scandal.
March 20, 2012
National interest should guide the country rather than ideology or money.
Read More

Traveling the Rural Road

CEO devotes career to the financial needs of small-town North Carolina.
March 29, 2011
In high school, Maurice Smith was voted “most likely to become a bank president.” He fared far better, becoming CEO of Local Government FCU.
Read More

Fixing the Economy

CUNA's economists debate the merits of government stimulus vs. fiscal restraint.
October 26, 2010
In 1932, John Maynard Keynes ignited a debate among economists and policy makers that still burns to this day. In a letter to the Times of London, Keynes proposed using federal deficit spending to reduce the length and severity of the Great Depression. Is that the best approach to tackle today's economic challenges?
Read More

What Could Have Been

A recent report shows how government intervention helped avert 'Great Depression 2.0.'
October 10, 2010
Has government action hurt or helped the economic recovery?
Read More

Federal Debt and the Risk of a Fiscal Crisis

Persistent deficits and mounting debt could have negative economic consequences for the U.S.
August 11, 2010
Over the past few years, U.S. government debt held by the public has grown rapidly—to the point that, compared with the total output of the economy, it is now higher than it has ever been except during the period around World War II.
Read More

heroes

What's Popular

Popular Stories

Recent Discussion

Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

Your Say: Who should be Credit Union Magazine's 2014 CU Hero of the Year?

View Results Poll Archive