Items Tagged with 'trust'

ARTICLES

The Road to Insurance Can Get Confusing

It ultimately comes down to trust between members, your CU, and your provider.
May 26, 2013
Is this something credit unions should have in their product and service repertoire? Depends.
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Poodles or Ferrets?

Things aren’t always what they seem.
April 15, 2013
Financial fraudsters exhibit dogged determination.
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Step Into the Role of a Leader Without Stumbling

Five tips for first-time leaders to get off to a positive start.
October 1, 2012
The move to a role where you’re responsible for the work of others can be abrupt and awkward.
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A Merger of Equals

Perhaps the most challenging merger involves two CUs of similar size.
August 1, 2012
Mergers of credit unions, especially those of relatively equal size, can be difficult because the partners often struggle with leadership, governance, and cultural issues.


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Fixated on Fascination

Discovering how you fascinate others can lead to more effective and persuasive communication.
May 11, 2012
CUs can create strong and immediate emotional reactions by standing out and taking a stand.
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Cooperative Financial Leadership in the Lone Star State

CU has helped members achieve financial success for more than 75 years.
March 15, 2012
Texas Trust CU has earned a reputation as a dedicated community partner.
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Moving Mobile Forward

It’s time to step up mobile execution, urges a Fiserv white paper.
December 20, 2011
With the proliferation of smartphones and the entrance of nontraditional competitors, financial institutions face an “urgent call to action.”
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Trust Is a Lofty, Worthwhile, Strategic Goal

Trust resonates better with members and the public than any other CU characteristic.
March 22, 2011
In a time when trusted icons, elected officials, and institutions fall short, people are becoming more cynical and distrusting, in general.
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Want Market Share? Build ‘Mind Share’

CUs have a great story to tell.
March 21, 2011
It’s more important than ever for CU brands to capture members’ heads, hearts, trust, and loyalty.
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A Tale of Opportunities

"It was the best of times, it was the worst of times..."
August 30, 2010
How might Charles Dickens's sage narrative apply to credit unions today? It's easy to focus only on the difficulties credit unions face right now. Afterall, there are many reasons for gloom.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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