Items Tagged with 'customers'

ARTICLES

Improve the Member Experience: Three Steps

Amid tough economic times, it pays to pay attention to those who pay your bills.
March 14, 2013
Adapt to your customers' needs, reward those who are loyal to you, and don't just listen to their complaints—address them.
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Service is the Problem; Technology is the Answer

Responsiveness and ease of doing business are key to member loyalty.
March 14, 2013
Members will leave when it becomes more difficult to do business with you than to move their accounts.
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Harness Members’ Social Power

Consumers can contribute immediately and powerfully to a better service experience.
October 1, 2012
Social media has become an integral part of the consumer experience, but few companies embrace it.
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Big, Small, or Online: Why Do Young Adults Choose a Financial Institution?

Convenience, whether geographical or electronic, is king for young consumers.
September 17, 2012
What's a CU to do in the face of "convenience competition?" Fight back.
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Gain Social Media Traction with Members

Seven steps to take advantage of social consumers.
September 10, 2012
Encourage members to share their thoughts about the CU, both good and bad.
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Maximize Existing Relationships with Cross-Selling

Doing so is the key to achieving sustained portfolio growth.
January 24, 2012
Identify current members’ needs and match them to individual credit risk and affordability measures.
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Why Do Consumers Switch PFIs?

The top trigger is a change in the consumer’s life circumstances.
September 18, 2011
In 2011, 8.7% of consumers had changed their primary financial institution within the previous 12 months.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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