Articles by Bill Cheney

Welcome to New York!

CUNA President/CEO encourages participation in Unite for Good.
June 24, 2013
Learn more about Unite for Good during the America's CU Conference.
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Capital is King

Well-capitalized CUs can weather difficulties and protect the insurance fund from losses.
June 17, 2013
The Capital Access for Small Businesses and Jobs Act would strengthen CUs and be consistent with our not-for-profit, cooperative nature.
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Delivering Substance on Regulatory Relief

CUNA, leagues, and CUs sent lawmakers ideas on reducing the reg burden.
June 6, 2013
When it comes to regulatory relief, CUs deliver substance with the rhetoric.
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President's Perspective

Time for Action on ‘the Vision’

Our goals for a united vision are ambitious—as they should be.
April 22, 2013
Values-based service is part of our DNA—and this shift thus fits right into our wheelhouse.
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President's Perspective

Our Focus Is on Value and Trust

Emphasize to lawmakers the key role you play in members’ lives.
March 20, 2013
CUNA's agenda is clear: Help the middle class emerge successfully from the devastation of the Great Recession.
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President's Perspective

Our Focus Is on Value and Trust

Emphasize to lawmakers the key role you play in members’ lives.
March 1, 2013
The agenda is clear: Help the middle class emerge successfully from the devastation of the Great Recession.
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CUs’ Regulatory Burden Will Be Our Focus

Survey results on CUs’ exam issues will guide us in working with regulators.
February 18, 2013
We’ll urge Congress to exercise greater oversight on regulatory issues—to ensure accountability for agency actions.
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GAC 2013

GAC Attracts Heavy Hitters

House speaker part of a powerful, bipartisan lineup of congressional and regulatory speakers.
February 13, 2013
'This is our opportunity to educate and enlighten members of Congress about the value of CUs.’
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President's Perspective

Our Commitment for the New Year

CUNA will take the strongest stand possible to protect the CU tax exemption.
January 14, 2013
Paul Gentile has joined CUNA as executive vice president, strategic communications and engagement.
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Support Those Who Support CUs

PAC contributions help CU friends win or hold onto their elective offices.
December 14, 2012
Money is a critical element in today’s political environment, but there’s much more to it than dollars.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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