Articles by Judy Dahl

Post-Recession Staffing Strategies

Today’s employees must be highly trained, adaptable, and tech-savvy.
August 13, 2012
Credit unions are looking at staffing differently these days because of the challenging economy and changing technology.
Read More

Advice for Tomorrow’s Leaders  

Cultivate good interpersonal skills, and know the right questions to ask.
July 1, 2012
The path to excellent leadership often includes some form of executive training. Among the options for training is CUNA Management School.
Read More

Multitasking Employees

Recession-induced cost-cutting has resulted in leaner staffs and 'universal' employees.
April 1, 2012
The Great Recession left indelible marks on nearly all aspects of CU operations—and staff.
Read More

Strategic Planning  During Uncertain Times

Consumer confidence is still fragile, and the economic outlook changes daily.
December 1, 2011
Strategic planning is even more challenging during uncertain times.
Read More

Consider Members’ Stories  When Making Loan Decisions

CUs make more loans and increase member loyalty by empowering their loan officers.
November 22, 2011
Members' stories can play a key role in loan decisions, CEOs agree.
Read More

Handling Post-Recession Repossessions

CUs work fast and smart to keep repos under control.
October 1, 2011
To turn around recession-related increases in repossessions, CUs have beefed up their loan-assessment processes, initiated faster action on collection procedures, and worked diligently to help members avoid repossessions.
Read More

 Reactions to NCUA’ s  Final Rule on Corporates

CUs want to support the system, but they might have to look outside for some services.
September 1, 2011
Although NCUA’s final rule on corporate credit unions eliminates some onerous provisions from previous versions, it limits retail credit unions’ choices and increases the need for financial scrutiny. And with fewer corporates left, some credit unions are looking outside the credit union movement for services.
Read More

Play Every Day

Tips on how to take leadership to the next level.
August 4, 2011
Asking Ron Burniske how he keeps his leadership skills sharp is like asking how baseball players keep their hitting skills sharp.
Read More

Taking Leadership to the Next Level

Don’t check out or rest on your laurels.
August 1, 2011
Learning to lead isn't a finite process, say credit union CEOs. It's a lifelong quest.
Read More

CUs Serve Only One Master

Their exclusive focus on member needs is still CUs’ best competitive edge.
July 1, 2011
What's the single most enduring factor giving credit unions a competitive edge?
Read More

heroes

What's Popular

Popular Stories

Recent Discussion

Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

Your Say: Who should be Credit Union Magazine's 2014 CU Hero of the Year?

View Results Poll Archive