Articles by Mike Schenk

Trendlines

Capital Plan Creates Grave Concerns

NCUA’s risk-based capital proposal would require CUs to hold billions more in capital.
April 1, 2014
‘The clock is ticking: The comment period on this proposal expires May 28.’
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A Tale of Two Movements

The state of the CU movement is vastly improved, but challenges remain, especially for small CUs.
February 4, 2014
As a group, small CUs face shrinking membership and loan growth.
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An Uneven Recovery

The state of the CU movement is vastly improved, but not all CUs are seeing the same results.
January 6, 2014
The state of the CU movement is vastly improved, but not all CUs are seeing the same results.
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Economy is ‘Recovering, Not Recovered’

Despite good news regarding CU membership, lending, and earnings, some CUs continue to struggle.
October 21, 2013
New-auto lending continues to be a bright spot for many CUs.
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Trendlines

Public Debt and GDP

Is the government’s focus on austerity coming at the wrong time?
July 15, 2013
The pace of U.S. economic growth continues to lag long-run norms.
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Trendlines

The Time Is Now for Capital Reform

CUs need it, regulators support it, and legislation has been introduced.
April 22, 2013
Credit unions want—and need—capital reform. The time is now
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Trendlines

Housing Is Staging a Comeback

CUs have doubled their share of mortgage originations in less than a decade.
January 6, 2013
Home sales are expected to rise 3% and home prices are expected to rise 2% to 3% in 2013.
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Employment Picture a Bit Fuzzy

Bureau of Labor Statistics sends mixed signals about labor market health.
November 1, 2012
There is good and bad news on the economy, says CUNA economist Mike Schenk.
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Latest Reports Indicate Slower Recovery

 It might take a bit longer to dig out of the Great Recession’s very deep trough.
August 20, 2012
While the economic recovery likely will remain on track, CUNA’s economists now expect marginally slower economic growth.
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Back on Track?

Expect modest growth and stronger earnings in the months ahead.
May 1, 2012
CUNA economists recently dusted off their crystal ball. The prognostications probably won’t shock you, but you might be pleasantly surprised.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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