Articles by Steve Rodgers

What’s in a Name?

 The term ‘member’ can imply barriers to admission.
July 12, 2012
Nearly 70% of nonmembers ages 18 to 24 are “not at all familiar” with credit unions. And nearly 80% of consumers in that age group don’t know if they’re eligible to join.
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Top Planning Trends: Part II

Important Topics for CU Strategic Planning

Leaders should consider lending, governance, membership growth, technology, and compliance.
June 8, 2012
Lending will continue to be a struggle, but loans are on the uptick for most CUs.
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Top Planning Trends: Part I

What CU Leaders Need to Know for the Coming Year

Planning should include mobile, antibank sentiment, awareness, earnings, and staffing.
June 7, 2012
The wave of new members spurred on by Bank Transfer Day means a greater emphasis on onboarding and member retention, too.
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Top Ten Planning Topics

Use these topics to shape discussions at your strategic planning sessions.
June 1, 2012
Reap the benefits of Bank Transfer Day, prioritize nonmember awareness and focus on governance.
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Improve Members’ Online Experience

Studies show about 50% of attempts to open accounts online fail.
May 14, 2012
Studies show about 50% of attempts to open accounts online fail.
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 Is Isis Keeping You  Up at Night?

Major players are building a mobile-payments platform.
April 15, 2012
What could an organization called Isis and events taking place in Barcelona possibly have to do with credit unions?
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Only One Shot at a First Impression

Keep Bank Transfer Day momentum rolling.
March 12, 2012
First impressions are important. Over the years, astute observers have noted that you never get a second chance to make a first impression, and first impressions are often the most accurate.
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‘Onboarding’ Clock Is Ticking

The first 60 to 90 days are critical for success.
January 13, 2012
By any measure, Bank Transfer Day must be considered a success.
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‘It’s Not Me, It’s You’

Ending a relationship can be painful, even if it’s with a bank.
December 11, 2011
The Facebook-fueled Bank Transfer Day convinced thousands of consumers to break off their bank relationships and move on.
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Mobile Security Jitters

A growing number of consumers tag smartphones as 'unsafe' or 'very unsafe.'
November 1, 2011
Researchers at Javelin Strategy & Research were stumped when despite strong annual increases in smartphone adoption, a recent study showed no corresponding increase in consumer adoption of mobile banking.
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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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