Training

Training Options Help CUs Shoulder Reg Burden

March 10, 2012
Credit unions’ compliance burden has never been heavier. Fortunately, the list of CUNA’s training opportunities has never been longer. READ MORE

 Sharpen Your Board’s Financial Skills

March 01, 2012
When NCUA’S new financial literacy rules went into effect last July, credit unions took a closer look at their directors’ basic financial skills. READ MORE

Calculate Your Scheduling ROI

February 24, 2012
Failing to optimize workforce productivity leads to further squeezing of already tight margins. READ MORE

The Trainer’s Call

February 09, 2012
Motivation, inspiration, and energy are the wellsprings of motivation for the CU training professional. READ MORE

Gear Up Now for Training

February 01, 2012
Professionals and volunteers are heading back to the classroom, and these CUNA schools offer innovative approaches for handling new regulations. READ MORE

CUs Boast Low Turnover Rates

January 18, 2012
CUs should monitor staffing to see not only why employees are leaving, but also why they’re staying. READ MORE

Matz: NCUA Exams Will Focus on Lending Risks

January 10, 2012
Continued high unemployment and low real estate values will put pressure on CU loan portfolios. READ MORE

Four Tips for Conflict-Busting Conversations

January 07, 2012
Remember, you’re having a conversation not a trial. READ MORE

What You Don’t Know Really Can Hurt You

September 12, 2011
Without proper security awareness training, most front-line employees will be unaware of their surroundings and oblivious to social engineering. READ MORE

Boost Staff Morale Without Breaking the Bank

August 25, 2011
Author says appreciation and respect trump money every time. READ MORE

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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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