Operations

Branch Planning: Tips From the Trenches

July 01, 2009
Every CU must manage its organization based on its strategic vision. That applies to building plans as well. READ MORE

How to Communicate Branch Closings

June 29, 2009
By Judy Dahl Debra Griggs : Tell staff how you'll take care of them throughout the process. Deciding to close a branch is a tough decision. And communicating this decision to employees and members isn’t any easier, credit union executives say. Doing so requires developing a thorough communication plan, says... READ MORE

Building Buzzwords for 2009

June 29, 2009
By Mary Mink Across the country, credit unions are building branches in support of their strategic plans and planning to build more despite the economy—or possibly because of it. Some credit unions "are taking advantage of this time. Construction is as cost-effective as it's going to get. Right now you... READ MORE

Closing Time

June 17, 2009
How to determine when a branch has outlived its usefulness. Judy Dahl Closing a branch is one of the hardest decisions credit unions can make, says Debra Griggs, vice president of member relations at $918 million asset United Federal Credit Union, St. Joseph, Mich. “It affects the members who use... READ MORE

Is Your CU Ready For a Pandemic?

June 17, 2009
Business continuity plans must address many risks, including H1N1 flu outbreaks. Valerie Moss Credit unions can experience a disruption in operations anytime, ranging in severity from a short-term power outage to a severe weather-related event such as tornado or flood. A disruption also may come from an infectious disease outbreak,... READ MORE

A Time to Build

June 17, 2009
Mary Mink CUs with resources and vision are making the most of lower construction costs and real estate bargains. A credit union branch groundbreaking takes on greater meaning today for the optimism and anticipation of the growth it symbolizes. Across the country, credit unions are building branches in support of... READ MORE

Raise the Bar On Member Service: Six Standards

May 28, 2009
Implementing six minimum service standards has created a strong member service culture at $400 million asset Air Academy Federal Credit Union, Colorado Springs, Colo.—and has had some unexpected benefits as well. “It’s a cliché, but these standards have raised the bar for member service,” says Keith Kauffeld, vice president of... READ MORE

Payments Don't Have to Mean Risk Exposure and Loss

May 28, 2009
By Wences Casares As the nation races toward a cashless society where debit and credit cards are swiped for lattes and burgers, new payment technologies are evolving that provide even greater benefits. But credit unions, merchants, and members may not realize the distinct differences in local versus global payment types... READ MORE

The 2000s: Y2K to Recession

May 20, 2009
LEAD STORY In celebration of U.S. credit unions’ 100th anniversary, Credit Union Magazine has been reflecting on the movement’s history. The following piece, adapted from “For the People for 100 Years,” a new book from the Credit Union National Association (CUNA), offers a snapshot of the first decade of the... READ MORE

Falling Out of Free Fall

May 20, 2009
Bill Hampel   The U.S economy’s rate of decline is slowing. Beginning last fall, for several months economists were shocked with worse-than-expected monthly economic data. After a mild recession for the first three quarters of 2008, the bottom fell out of the economy, culminating with a 6.3% decline in gross... READ MORE

heroes

What's Popular

Popular Stories

Recent Discussion

Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

Your Say: Who should be Credit Union Magazine's 2014 CU Hero of the Year?

View Results Poll Archive