Management

Work Continues On Stabilization Program

March 30, 2009
Mary Dunn The final costs to CUs are unknown at this time. Most agree the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) Board needed to act in January to assist the corporate credit unions and that it had few options. Concerned about capital and liquidity in these institutions that also might affect... READ MORE

Unforeseen Consequences Of Black Swans

March 30, 2009
Bill Klewin It’s time to rethink all your old lending assumptions. In my April 2008 column, I wrote about black swans. To refresh your memory, a black swan is a highly improbable event with three principal characteristics: 1) It’s unpredictable; 2) it carries a massive impact; and 3) after the... READ MORE

Look for Opportunities Behind Corporate Banter

March 30, 2009
Pam Finch NCUA’s corporate CU proposal liberates movement leaders to talk structure. When news of the National Credit Union Administration’s (NCUA) corporate stabilization plan broke, you almost could see the smoke rising from the network server housing the CUNA CFO Council e-mail list activity. The opinions and emotions of the... READ MORE

CUs Need Conflict of Interest Policies, Disclosures

March 30, 2009
Kathleen Thompson Take note of IRS Form 990’s new Part VI on nonprofit governance. A new Internal Revenue Service (IRS) requirement has focused attention on credit unions’ need for conflict of interest policies and annual disclosure processes for board members and senior staff to report possible conflicts. Review a sample... READ MORE

Thwart Internal Theft And Fraud

March 30, 2009
Sharyn Alden Develop and communicate strong antifraud policies and procedures. In a perfect world, all employees are honest and trustworthy at all times. This isn’t a perfect world. Technological changes and new products and services make preventing internal theft and fraud an ever-challenging endeavor, agree credit union executives. The tough... READ MORE

Unlimited Reasons To Serve Unmet Needs

March 30, 2009
Mark Condon Purpose-driven CUs have done business right for 100 years. Purpose drives everything. That’s the primary theme of a timely new business book titled “It’s Not What You Sell, It’s What You Stand For: Why Every Extraordinary Business Is Driven by Purpose.” Written by Roy M. Spence Jr. with... READ MORE

Forbes Has Solutions

March 30, 2009
LEAD STORY Forbes Has Solutions “In 2004, the Federal Reserve made a fateful miscalculation,” said Steve Forbes, editor of Forbes magazine, during the Credit Union National Association’s (CUNA) recent Governmental Affairs Conference (GAC) in Washington, D.C. Determining the U.S. was heading into a decade-long recession like Japan, the Fed started... READ MORE

'We'll Get Through This Together'

March 27, 2009

CUNA President/CEO Dan Mica to GAC attendees: 'Our work as your trade association is focused on finding other alternatives...and mitigating the cost to CUs.'

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Where's the Good News?

February 20, 2009
CUs sense a renewed urgency to invest in their communities. READ MORE

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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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