Articles Tagged with 'benefits'

CUs Benefit All Consumers

March 06, 2014
American consumers benefit to the tune of $8.5 billion due to CUs' presence in the marketplace. READ MORE

Five Ways to Take Advantage of Health-Care Reform

August 26, 2013
Health-care exchanges will allow CUs to maintain quality benefit programs while expanding options for employees. READ MORE

IRS Rules Complicate Compensation Reporting Requirements

March 08, 2013
The CU movement must maintain its reputation for reasonable and transparent executive compensation. READ MORE

CUNA's Membership Benefits Award Honors CUs That Best Beat the Banks

February 25, 2013
The top three performers in each asset category were United Health Credit Union, Burlingame, Calif.; Boston Firefighters Credit Union, Dorchester, Mass.; and Melrose Credit Union, Briarwood, N.Y. READ MORE

Benefit Costs Shift to Staff

January 30, 2013
Communicating health-care actions can help CUs manage the impact of benefits changes. READ MORE

Benefits Still Matter in a Down Economy

January 29, 2013
When benefits start to slide, salaries become far more important. READ MORE

CUs Grapple with Rising Benefit Costs

January 14, 2013
While wages stagnate, health insurance costs continue to rise. READ MORE

Maintain a Competitive Edge with Benefits

December 28, 2012
Executive pay in for-profit businesses continues to increase despite weak profit growth. READ MORE

Consumers Must Speak Up to Support CUs

November 09, 2012
CUs will be challenged to show everyone that assaulting the CU tax exemption won’t be worth it. READ MORE

Celebrate the CU Difference

October 24, 2012
These resources will help you celebrate International Credit Union Day and better inform your board. READ MORE

heroes

What's Popular

Popular Stories

Recent Discussion

Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

Your Say: Who should be Credit Union Magazine's 2014 CU Hero of the Year?

View Results Poll Archive