Community Service

Veridian CU, CUNA Mutual Group Fund Youth Leadership Program

Organizations pledge $105,000 for ‘The Leader in Me.’

August 09, 2013
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Veridian Credit Union, Waterloo, Iowa, and CUNA Mutual Group are collaborating to help ensure an effective leadership development initiative reaches the students of two more Cedar Valley area schools.

The organizations have pledged to contribute $105,000 to the Greater Cedar Valley Alliance & Chamber’s Leader Valley initiative to further implement “The Leader in Me” program.

The Leader in Me builds valuable 21st-century personal skills that correlate to success in education and the workplace. As students put into practice the principles of Stephen Covey’s “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People,” they become more self-confident and take ownership for their lives.

The program results in higher academic achievement, fewer discipline problems, and increased engagement among teachers and parents.

CUNA Mutual Group, through its foundation, committed $75,000 to sponsor implementation of The Leader in Me at George Washington Carver Academy Middle School and Kittrell Elementary, both in Waterloo, Iowa.

Veridian Credit Union committed $30,000 to Kittrell Elementary. The credit union also participates with Kittrell Elementary in the “Partners in Education” program. The sum will be distributed over a three year term. Initially, the gift will provide extensive training and materials to the staff and educators at these sponsored schools.

Fourteen schools participate in the program, which will involve 6,075 students and 842 educators during the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. This number represents more than one-third of all students and educators in the Waterloo, Cedar Falls, and Cedar Valley Catholic Schools.

“At Veridian Credit Union, we believe that everyone is a leader,” said Jean Trainor, Veridian Credit Union’s CEO/Chief Inclusion Officer. “The Leader In Me program demonstrates that same belief and benefits our entire community as much as it does the students who participate.”

Reid Koenig, vice president of CUNA Mutual Group adds, “When one interacts with students who have been impacted by The Leader in Me, you quickly realize the effect the program is already having in transforming their lives. Our communities and businesses will reap the benefit of building great citizens and leaders for years to come.”

The combined contribution will be presented Aug. 15.

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