Technology

FBI Warns of New ‘Drive-By’ Virus

Advise members and employees to exercise caution when going online.

September 11, 2012
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There is a new “drive-by” virus on the Internet, and it often carries a fake message—and fine—purportedly from the FBI.

“We’re getting inundated with complaints,” says Donna Gregory of the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3). She’s referring to the virus known as Reveton Ransomware, which is designed to extort money from its victims.

Reveton is described as drive-by malware because unlike many viruses—which activate when users open a file or attachment—this one can install itself when users simply click on a compromised website. Once infected, the victim’s computer immediately locks, and the monitor displays a screen stating there has been a violation of federal law.

The bogus message says the user’s Internet address was identified by the FBI or the Department of Justice’s Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section as having been associated with child pornography sites or other illegal online activity. To unlock their machines, users are required to pay a fine using a prepaid money card service.

“Some people have actually paid the so-called fine,” says Gregory, who oversees a team of cybercrime subject matter experts.

One victim explains, “While browsing the Internet a window popped up with no way to close it. The window was labeled FBI and said I was in violation of one of the following: illegal use of downloaded media, under-age porn viewing, or computer-use negligence.

“It listed fines and penalties for each and directed me to pay $200 via a MoneyPak order. Instructions were given on how to load the card and make the payment. The page said if the demands were not met, criminal charges would be filed and my computer would remain locked on that screen.”

The Reveton virus, used by hackers in conjunction with Citadel malware—a software delivery platform that can disseminate various kinds of computer viruses—first came to the attention of the FBI in 2011.

Since that time, the virus has become more widespread in the U.S. and internationally. Some variants of Reveton can even turn on computer webcams and display the victim’s picture on the frozen screen.

“We are getting dozens of complaints every day,” Gregory said, noting that there is no easy fix for the virus. “Unlike other viruses, Reveton freezes your computer and stops it in its tracks. And the average user will not be able to easily remove the malware.”

Two other pervasive Internet scams, according to IC3, include:

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