Technology

Eight IT Predictions for 2011 and Beyond

Organizations will need to show a link between IT investments and business results.

February 14, 2011
KEYWORDS computing
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6. By 2015, 20% of non-IT Global 500 companies will be cloud service providers

The move by non-IT organizations to provide non-IT capabilities via cloud computing will further expand the role of IT decision making outside the IT organization.

This represents yet another opportunity for IT organizations to redefine their value proposition as service enablers—with either consumption or provision of cloud-based services.

As non-IT players externalize core competencies via the cloud, they will be interjecting themselves into value chain systems and competing directly with IT organizations that have traditionally served in this capacity.

7. By 2014, 90% of organizations will support corporate applications on personal devices

The trend toward supporting corporate applications on employee-owned notebooks and smartphones is already underway in many organizations and will become commonplace within four years.

The main driver for adoption of mobile devices will be employees—individuals who prefer to use private, consumer smartphones or notebooks for business rather than using old-style limited enterprise devices.

IT is set to enter the next phase of this consumerization trend, in which the attention of users and IT organizations shifts from devices, infrastructure, and applications to information and interaction with peers. This change in view will herald the start of the postconsumerization era.

8. By 2013, 80% of businesses will support a workforce using tablets

The Apple iPad is the first of what promises to be a huge wave of media tablets focused largely on content consumption and communications rather than content creation, with fewer features and less processing power than traditional PCs and notebooks.

Support requirements for media tablets will vary across and within enterprises depending on use scenarios.

At a minimum, in cases where employees bring their own devices for convenience, enterprises will have to offer appliance-level support with a limited level of network connectivity (which will likely include access to enterprise mail and calendaring) and help desk support for connectivity issues.

Visit Gartner’s website for more information.

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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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