Technology

Eight IT Predictions for 2011 and Beyond

Organizations will need to show a link between IT investments and business results.

February 14, 2011
KEYWORDS computing
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3. By 2015, new revenue generated each year by IT will affect CIO compensation

Four initiatives—context-aware computing, IT’s direct involvement in enterprise innovation development efforts, pattern-based strategies, and harnessing the power of social networks—can potentially directly increase enterprise revenue.

Executive and board-level expectations for realizing revenue from those and other IT initiatives will become so common that, in 2015, the amount of new revenue generated from IT initiatives will become the primary factor determining the incentive portion of new Global 2000 chief information officers’ annual compensation.

4. By 2015, information-smart businesses will increase recognized IT spending per head by 60%

IT-enabled enterprises that successfully navigated the recent recession and return to growth will benefit from many internal and external dynamics.

Consolidation, optimization, and cost transparency programs have made decentralized IT investments more visible, increasing “recognized” IT spending.

This, combined with staff reduction and freezes, will reward the leading companies within each industry segment with an IT productivity windfall that culminates in at least a 60% increase in the metric for “IT spending per enterprise employee” when compared against the metrics of peer organizations and internal trending metrics.

5. By 2015, tools and automation will eliminate 25% of labor hours associated with IT services

As the IT services industry matures, it will increasingly mirror other industries, such as manufacturing, in transforming from a craftsmanship to a more industrialized model.

Cloud computing will hasten the use of tools and automation in IT services as the new paradigm brings with it self-service, automated provisioning and metering, etc., to deliver industrialized services with the potential to transform the industry from a high-touch custom environment to one characterized by automated delivery of IT services.

Next: Here comes the cloud

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Great article! Unfortunately, most employees don’t feel valued or appreciated by their supervisors or employers. In fact, research has shown that the predominant reason team members quit their jobs is because they don’t feel valued. This is in spite of the fact that employee recognition programs have proliferated in the workplace – over 90% of all organizations in the U.S. has some form of employee recognition activities in place. But most employee recognition programs are viewed with skepticism and cynicism – because they aren’t viewed as being genuine in their communication of appreciation. Getting the “employee of the month” award, receiving a certificate of recognition, or a “Way to go, team!” email just don’t get the job done. How do you communicate authentic appreciation? We have found people have different ways that they want to be shown appreciation, and if you don’t communicate in the language of appreciation important to them, you essentially “miss the mark”. Additionally, employees need to receive recognition more than once a year at their performance review. Otherwise, they view the praise as “going through the motions”. A third component of authentic appreciation is that the communication has to be about them personally – not the department, not their group, but something they did. Finally, they have to believe that you mean what you say. How you treat them has to match the words you use. If you are not sure how your team members want to be shown appreciation, the Motivating By Appreciation Inventory (www.appreciationatwork.com/assess) will identify the language of appreciation and specific actions preferred by each employee. You then can create a group profile for your team, so everyone knows how to encourage one another. Remember, employees want to know that they are valued for what they contribute to the success of the organization. And communicating authentic appreciation in the ways they desire it can make the difference between keeping your quality team members or having a negative work environment that everyone wants to leave. Paul White, Ph.D., is the co-author of The 5 Languages of Appreciation in the Workplace with Dr. Gary Chapman.

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