Management

Filene Names New Research Fellow

Professor teaches law at the University of Michigan.

January 20, 2011
KEYWORDS filene , research
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Michael S. Barr, professor of law at the University of Michigan Law School and former assistant secretary for financial institutions at the U.S. Treasury Department, is the newest Filene Research Fellow.

He joins a distinguished panel of researchers and academics that creates a formal link between the Filene Research Institute and top thought leaders in the consumer finance world.

“I'm excited to join the top-notch Research Fellows and contribute to the work of Filene in understanding the financial services needs of American households and businesses,” Barr says.

At the University of Michigan, Professor Barr teaches financial regulation and international finance. He also co-founded the International Transactions Clinic.

In 2009 and 2010, he served as the U.S. Department of the Treasury's assistant secretary for financial institutions, where he was a key architect of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

“Attracting Professor Barr is a testament to both the value and the potential of credit unions in today’s marketplace,” says Mark Meyer, CEO of the Filene Research Institute. “His academic work and his intimate knowledge of the currents of financial regulation will help Filene continue to publish essential research and experiment with new, innovative models to deliver consumer financial services.”

Professor Barr conducts large-scale empirical research regarding financial services and writes about a wide range of issues in financial regulation. Recent books include “Building Inclusive Financial Systems” and “Insufficient Funds.”

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